Historical record of the Leaning Tower of Pisa falling

The Leaning Tower of Pisa, an iconic medieval architectural marvel located in Pisa, Italy, is renowned for its distinctive tilt. The tower's construction began in 1173, and due to the unstable foundation of soft soil and inadequate base, it began to lean during its construction. Over the years, various attempts were made to counteract the tilt, but the tower continued to lean. However, the tower's collapse wasn't due to the famous lean itself. In 1990, there were serious concerns about its structural stability and the risk it posed to tourists and nearby structures.


A project was undertaken to stabilize and straighten the tower, involving intricate engineering methods such as soil extraction and counterweights. The tower was closed to the public for over a decade during these restoration efforts. In 2001, after extensive work, the tower was reopened to visitors, standing more stable and secure than before. The fall of the Leaning Tower of Pisa was thus averted through meticulous restoration and engineering, preserving its unique tilt while ensuring its safety for generations to come.

The Beginning of the Construction of the Leaning Tower of Pisa
The Beginning of the Construction of the Leaning Tower of Pisa

The construction of the Leaning Tower of Pisa began in 1173 in the city of Pisa, Italy. Intended as the freestanding bell tower for the nearby cathedral, the tower's foundation was laid on soft soil and clay. As construction progressed, the tower's weight caused it to start leaning due to the unstable ground. This initial tilting marked the beginning of the tower's iconic lean, which would later become its defining feature. Despite efforts to correct the tilt during construction, the tower's unique and unintended characteristics persisted, making it a globally recognized architectural wonder.

The Tower of Pisa Starts to Lean
The Tower of Pisa Starts to Lean

The Fall of Leaning Tower of Pisa arose due to the tower's foundation being laid on unstable and uneven soil, comprising soft clay and sand. As the tower's weight increased during construction, the ground's inability to provide adequate support caused the structure to lean. The tower's initial leaning marked the start of its distinctive inclination, eventually evolving into one of the most recognizable architectural quirks globally and attracting visitors from around the world.

Bells On Top
Resting Period

This period in the Leaning Tower’s history was due to the fact that the tower began to lean in the year 1178, because of the soil structure beneath the ground. At the same time, Pisa was involved in a war against Genoa, leading to a massive gap of about 94 years, until the year 1272, when the Fall of Leaning Tower of Pisa was actively looked into.

Reconstruction
Reconstruction

After nearly a century’s gap, the work on restoring the tower began, under the exceptional engineer, Giovanni de Simone. The period of reconstructing the Fall of Leaning tower of Pisa took almost 12 years, and it was seven floors tall. However, due to another war, which broke out between Pisa and Genoa, the rebuilding of the tower had to be halted again.

Finishing the Tower
Finishing the Tower

The Fall of Leaning Tower of Pisa was restored until the year 1350, this time managed by the talented architect Rommano Pisano. Despite the tower's unintended tilt, construction of the Leaning Tower of Pisa was completed in 1350. Builders adapted their techniques to account for the lean, deliberately altering the upper floors' construction to offset the angle. Its completion despite the challenging circumstances showcases the determination of medieval builders and their ability to adapt to unexpected challenges, resulting in a lasting testament to human innovation.


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The Tilt Worsens Over Time
The Tilt Worsens Over Time

Two of the primary causes of the Leaning Tower of Pisa fall are the attempts of architects, Alessandro della Gerardesca and Benito Musslini, in the year 1838 and in 1934, respectively, to restore the tower. Gerardesca, in 1838, planned to uncover the incredibly carved tower base, in order to increase the Tower’s value. And Mussilini, in 1934, decided to change the leaning structure of the tower and make it vertical. Both of these attempts worsened the leaning property of the tower.

Danger of Toppling Over
Danger of Toppling Over

A significant part of the history of Leaning Tower of Pisa Fall was added in the year 1990, when the tower made global headlines due to the scientific predictions of it crashing down. The engineers predicted that beyond 5.44 degrees of tilt, the tower would fall; and the Leaning Tower of Pisa was standing with a tilt of 5.5 degrees. During the same time, the falling of another tower in Italy led to immediate closure of the Leaning Tower to repair, and restore the same.

Restoration Attempts
Restoration Attempts

After a turbulent history of rise and fall of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, the tower was finally rebuilt in 2001, following about 10 years of rebuilding work. The reconstruction however came with a 40 centi-meter loss of lean, and was restored into one of its initial versions which was in the year 1700s.


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FAQ

What caused the tilting of the Leaning Tower of Pisa?

    There are several causes to the titling of Leaning Tower of Pisa, including the alluvial soil conditions found in Pisa, and the blunders of architects such as Alessandro della Gerardesca and Benito Musslini.

What is the current tilt of the Leaning Tower of Pisa?

Is the Leaning Tower of Pisa losing its tilt?

How did they straighten the Leaning Tower of Pisa?

How long does it take the Tower of Pisa to fall?

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